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The woman in white zusammenfassung

Walter Hartright , a young drawing teacher who lives in London, needs a job and an escape from the city for the autumn months. Pesca tells Walter that he has found a job for him teaching art to a pair of young ladies in Cumberland, at a place called Limmeridge House, in the employment of a man named Mr. Walter is somewhat uneasy about the job but accepts. On the road he meets a young woman dressed head to toe in white clothes. She asks him the way to London and walks with Walter to the city. On the way, she asks Walter if he knows many powerful men there, and mutters something about a certain Baronet.

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The Woman in White

Walter Hartright , a young drawing teacher who lives in London, needs a job and an escape from the city for the autumn months. Pesca tells Walter that he has found a job for him teaching art to a pair of young ladies in Cumberland, at a place called Limmeridge House, in the employment of a man named Mr.

Walter is somewhat uneasy about the job but accepts. On the road he meets a young woman dressed head to toe in white clothes. She asks him the way to London and walks with Walter to the city. On the way, she asks Walter if he knows many powerful men there, and mutters something about a certain Baronet. Walter tells her he is only a drawing master and does not know anyone of rank. He tells her that he has just taken a job at Limmeridge House and is surprised to learn that the woman has been there and that she speaks fondly of the late Mrs.

The woman asks Walter if he will help her find a cab once they get to the city; Walter agrees, and he finds one quickly when they reach London.

As the cab drives off, another carriage passes Walter, and the man inside leans out and shouts to a nearby policeman. Walter travels to Limmeridge House to start his job. He does not like Mr. Fairlie, who is a pretentious man, but gets on well with his pupils, Marian Halcombe and Laura Fairlie.

Immediately, Walter notices that Laura reminds him of someone. He also tells Marian about the woman in white, as Marian is the late Mrs. Fairlie taught. At this moment, Laura comes inside from the garden, and Walter suddenly realizes that Laura looks like the mysterious woman in white.

Walter and Laura begin to fall in love. This seems to make Laura very sad, and one day, Marian takes Walter aside and tells him that Laura is engaged to marry a Baronet named Sir Percival Glyde.

She kindly tells Walter that he should leave Limmeridge because Sir Percival is expected to arrive in the next few days to make plans for the wedding. Walter is heartbroken but reluctantly agrees. While they are talking, a maid summons Marian back to the house because Laura is very upset—she has received an anonymous letter warning her not to marry Sir Percival.

Marian and Walter ask around in the village to see if anyone knows who sent the note, and they discover a woman in white has been seen near Mrs. Knowing this must be Anne Catherick, Walter decides to hide in the churchyard that night so he can speak to her if she comes back to Mrs.

Unable to calm her, Walter leaves Anne with her companion, an older woman named Mrs. Clements , and the next day he returns to London. Sir Percival Glyde comes to Limmeridge House to arrange his wedding. Laura is reluctant to marry him, but she has promised her father on his deathbed and feels too guilty to break the engagement.

Sir Percival seems charming and considerate, but Marian still does not like him. Hoping to get out of the engagement, Laura tells Sir Percival that she does not love him, and that she loves someone else, and offers him the chance to break off the engagement; however, Sir Percival delights in her honesty, confesses his undying love for her, and the wedding goes ahead as planned.

In the days that follow, Mr. Marian and Laura both deeply dislike the Count and are very afraid of him. His wife behaves suspiciously too and submissively does everything the Count says.

At one point, he tries to force Laura to sign a document without telling her what it is he has folded the paper so that only the signature line is visible , and becomes aggressive when Laura refuses to sign.

One day, on a walk to the boathouse near the lake in the grounds, Laura meets Anne Catherick, who tells her that she knows a secret about Sir Percival. Laura agrees to meet Anne the next day. When she tries, however, Sir Percival follows her, drags her home, and locks her in her room. He tries to force her to sign the document again but Count Fosco stops him. She tries to write to Mr.

Fairlie and Mr. One night, Marian overhears Sir Percival and Count Fosco in the garden and hears them discuss plan to murder Laura for her fortune. Unfortunately, Marian gets soaked in a rain shower while crouching on the roof to listen and becomes ill with typhus. One day, the housekeeper, Mrs. Michelson , sees Count Fosco come in from a walk and Sir Percival asks if he has found her, at which Count Fosco smiles.

Sir Percival sends Mrs. Michelson away to look at seaside houses for him to rent and, when she returns, she is told that Marian has been sent to Limmeridge, and that Laura will follow suit the next day.

All the servants are to be dismissed, and the house is to be shut up. Michelson is shocked but takes Laura to the station and sees her off on the train to London. When she arrives back at Blackwater, she discovers that Marian is still at the house and that Laura has been tricked. When Laura gets to London, she is taken to stay with Count Fosco, but dies the next day from heart failure.

When she arrives, she discovers that it is not Anne in the asylum but Laura, who has been disguised against her will as Anne. Marian breaks her sister out of the asylum, and they return to Limmeridge, but find that everyone there believes that Laura is dead.

In the churchyard, where Anne has been buried in Mrs. Marian and Walter move to London, and Walter decides to investigate Sir Percival Glyde to see if he can uncover his secret.

He visits Mrs. Walter then visits Mrs. Walter runs to the nearby village to check this information in the second copy of the marriage register, and the forgery is confirmed. When he returns to the church that night, Walter is startled to find that it is on fire, and that Sir Percival, of all people, is trapped inside.

He has accidentally set the church alight while trying to destroy the forgery and is killed in the blaze. Catherick writes to Walter and tells him that Anne never knew the secret, but that Sir Percival locked her in the asylum just in case she did know it. In the midst of all of this chaos, Walter and Laura marry. He tracks him down one night at the opera and takes Pesca with him to see if Pesca, who was once involved in Italian politics, recognizes the Count.

Pesca does not, but the Count recognizes Pesca instantly and flees the opera house in fear. He is followed by a foreign man who had been watching Walter and Pesca carefully during the opera. Walter questions Pesca and Pesca confesses that he was a member of a secret political organization in Italy in his youth and suspects that the Count is a traitor to this same organization.

The Count agrees to do this if Walter will let him go and intercept the letter to Pesca. The Count then writes a confession which proves that Laura is the real Laura Fairlie, and that Anne Catherick is the woman who died at his house. Some months later, Walter gets a job which takes him to Paris. He has been stabbed by the foreign man who saw them at the opera, who is a member of the political organization Count Fosco betrayed.

Walter and Laura have a son and, when Mr. The Woman in White. Plot Summary. Gilmore Mrs. Catherick Mrs. Clements Mrs. Michelson Mr. Kyrle The Clerk Mrs. Rubelle Mr. Dawson Mr. Merriman Mrs. Vesey Margaret Poacher. LitCharts Teacher Editions. Teach your students to analyze literature like LitCharts does. Detailed explanations, analysis, and citation info for every important quote on LitCharts.

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Die Frau in Weiß

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Our story beings with Walter Hartright helpfully telling us that he's about to tell us a story. Glad he gave us that head's up.

The Woman in White is Wilkie Collins 's fifth published novel, written in It is considered to be among the first mystery novels and is widely regarded as one of the first and finest in the genre of " sensation novels ".

The events described in the novel take place in the s in England. A young painter from London, Walter Hartright , secures a position as an art teacher at Limmeridge House in Cumberland, which belongs to Frederick Fairlie. On a hot summer night prior to his departure, Walter meets a very strange woman on the empty street, who is dressed in a completely white dress. The woman in white shows a sudden agitation when Walter explains about his new job, but also speaks with love about Mrs. Fairlie, the late owner of Limmeridge House.

The Woman in White Summary

There, as if it had that moment sprung out of the earth Engaged as a drawing master to the beautiful Laura Fairlie, Walter is drawn into the sinister intrigues of Sir Percival Glyde and his 'charming' friend Count Fosco, who has a taste for white mice, vanilla bonbons and poison. Pursuing questions of identity and insanity along the paths and corridors of English country houses and the madhouse, The Woman in White is the first and most influential of the Victorian genre that combined Gothic horror with psychological realism. The Penguin English Library - editions of the best fiction in English, from the eighteenth century and the very first novels to the beginning of the First World War. In Collins had met Charles Dickens, who would become his close friend and mentor. Collins was soon writing unsigned articles and stories for Dickens's magazine, Household Words , and his novels were serialized in its pages. Collins brought out the boyish, adventurous side of Dickens's character; the two novelists traveled to Italy, Switzerland, and France together, and their travels produced such lighthearted collaborations as "The Lazy Tour of Two Idle Apprentices. Collins's first mystery novel was Hide and Seek His first popular success was The Woman in White , followed by No Name , Armadale , and The Moonstone , whose Sergeant Cuff became a prototype of the detective hero in English fiction.

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Apr 17, - Fairlie taught. Mrs. Fairlie's letter notes that she thought this girl, Anne Catherick, was strange but very sweet and gave her some white dresses to  Missing: zusammenfassung ‎| Must include: zusammenfassung.

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