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The woman at the well lessons

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Jump to navigation. If we go to school to the Samaritan woman at the well, what lessons can we learn for women in the church today? There are at least three dimensions to the instruction to be received from this unnamed woman, having to do with daring to question, with openness to truth and with taking responsibility. First, this woman is faced with a request from a stranger. He is a man and she is a woman; of course he might expect her to give him a drink. But, like Mary of Nazareth, she neither complies with the request nor refuses it before asking her own questions.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Jesus Met a Samaritan Woman

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Jesus and the Woman at the Well. John Chapter 4 Bible Movie

4 Lessons From The Woman At The Well {Guest Post by Stacey Pardoe}

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Seventh-day Adventists believe in inspiring those around us to experience a life of wholeness and hope for an eternal future with God. Conflict is in the air from the beginning of the Gospel of John. At that point, John introduces a subtle break in the story. The word but is soft, but there is, nevertheless, a flag waving to the reader to slow down. Did Jesus, strictly speaking, have to go through Samaria? What lies behind the notion that Jesus had to go through Samaria? There were other routes between Judea and Galilee—the coastal route or the Jordan Valley.

In the Gospel of John, Jesus never, or almost never, will do things simply because circumstances make Him do it.

This imposes on the reader the task of finding some other explanation for the necessity in this story. Jesus has to go through Samaria not because Samaria is on His way, but because Samaria is on His mind. He goes there by necessity, but the necessity is in Him, not in His circumstances. So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar, near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph.

It was about noon. To read these five verses takes about 30 seconds. But how long was the actual time in this exchange? She comes alone, not expecting anyone to be there. She eyes the stranger warily while Jesus does not pretend that she has not come there. Awareness of the other is the first element in the encounter. She will complete her errand despite the stranger sitting at the well. At this point, we have three main options. In option number one, Jesus begins the conversation immediately, asking for water, but He never gets any water because she immediately rejoins that the question is out of character with Jewish-Samaritan relations.

In option number two, she lowers the bucket to get her water before anything is said. Ten minutes, perhaps more, might have transpired before anyone says anything. In option number three, He asks for water right away. She proceeds to lower the bucket, saying nothing until she has the water. In this option, narrative time equals actual time. By now, we may be fifteen minutes into the encounter. So far, words have been few, but communication is not only by words.

Communication is also body language, facial expression, eye contact or an avoidance of eye contact, and tone of voice. It takes about 30 seconds to read the story, minus the historical elements and the circumstantial matters, and trust cannot be built in 30 seconds. We are well advised to settle for the 15 minutes or so of actual time before we proceed. Three huge barriers have been overcome in the span of the first 15 minutes—in 15 minutes and not 15 seconds.

First, a Jew talks to a Samaritan, breaching the socioethnic barrier. Second, a man talks to a woman, breaching the gender barrier. Third, a pious person talks to a sinful person, breaching the moral or religious barrier.

The latter point assumes the traditional view of the woman as a questionable character, a view that must suffice for now, even though there are other plausible constructs for her life story. In my work as a physician, everything hinges on establishing trust. Trust, in turn, is built less by how well we talk than by how well we listen.

On this point, the account confirms trust in the making when the woman decides to engage in a conversation that could have been avoided. It is not hard to imagine her hurrying away from the well without saying a word to the Stranger.

Instead, she stays to talk. Triggered by His simple question and reinforced by hers, the conversation will be one for the ages. We will have to speed up from here with only three additional points from the story itself. We move from His need to her need, from her water to His water vv. She does not quite get the point, but she gets the hint that she has a need and that God has a remedy for it. At that point, the conversation shifts gears vv.

Her denial could have been the end of the conversation for she certainly could have gotten up and left. He can only say what He will say next when He is confident of having earned her trust to the point of no return. This move is extremely daring but necessary and ultimately liberating. How He says it and how we say things matters more than what He said.

Again, a pause on her part is likely now that all is out in the open. What now? The authorized Greek text has a period after her concession, but the necessary pause that comes with the period must be supplied by the reader.

I believe that a long pause is necessary, perhaps several minutes. I do not share the widely held view that she wants to change the subject and eagerly rushes to do so. If her body language at this point is apprehensive and questioning, His is accepting and reassuring. And the progression in her view of Him has not run its course.

Only at that moment does she strike the ball, responding as though the definitive answer to her question must be deferred to an indefinite point in the future. However, she does not leave even though there might have been another moment of silence.

And she does not scoff at the claim. When the disciples reemerge in the story, no further conversation between the two is possible. He cannot be the Messiah, can he? Rather, the conversation between her and Jesus about her relational history ran to completion on the level of body language, even if words are lacking to that effect.

This history no longer represents a threat to her, spiritually, psychologically, socially, and otherwise. This is the highest point in the progression in her view of Him. What this term meant to her, John does not describe in his Gospel, but there is no doubt what it should mean to us.

Here, the reader of the Gospel has an advantage over the Samaritan woman, knowing explicitly what she may only have imagined implicitly. The Stranger who talked to her at the well is the Revealer. That is how great He is, the exceptional Jew who is greater than Jacob, a Prophet, too, and, in fact, the Messiah who is to come into the world John , 12, 19, Samaria is included in the itinerary of the Word Incarnate by design, not by accident.

In-person contact is the way of this Gospel, and the most consequential encounters in John happen one-on-one. They find themselves in Samaria because it is on the way between Judea and Galilee and not because they have an interest in the place.

She, nevertheless, will be the first to win Samaria; she, not His disciples and not a man. For the men in the story, four months remain until harvest. How to resolve this question in our time may be nudged to its inevitable destination by ascribing to Jesus the prerogative to reveal principle and prescribe policy.

Of all the compelling images in the story, perhaps the most riveting is the scene of Jesus sitting alone at the well at the point when the disciples return and the woman has left, His face exuding contentment.

They wonder if someone else has brought Him food v. His deepest need has been met in the encounter with the Samaritan woman v. To overcome prejudice, distrust, and the fracturing realities of convention may take time, and this also takes ingenuity and planning.

Pastoral ministry is, in this regard, no different from medical ministry. Confidence building knows no shortcuts. Such endeavors can, in the absence of trust, actually cause more harm than good. Most important, however, is the answer to the question with which we began.

Why did He have to go through Samaria? Geography is not the reason. He went there because of deeper needs, hers and His. Desire, however, is bottomless. The encounter begins with His need for her water vv.

Then this encounter moves to her need for His water v. But then, in a moment of splendid clarity, the encounter returns to His need for her. Read the ten-concept list as to how Christians should relate to the natural environment and enhance human well-being.

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4 Amazing Things We Can Learn from the Woman at the Well

Enter your email to subscribe to this blog, receive newsletters, and to receive new posts by email. Email Address. In this post, I am going to talk to you about the lessons learned from the woman at the well also known as the Samaritan woman. The biggest lesson that we can learn from the woman at the well is that she is the woman of today.

We don't have a lot on the story of the Samaritan Woman at the Well mostly because it's not one of the "major" stories of the Bible that Rotation fans teach. That said, we've been collecting good ideas and invite you to add your own!

Kids will learn that God wants us to share Jesus with everybody. Everybody eats Cheerios. In fact, for many babies, it's one of the first solid foods they eat. Kids will learn that the good news of Jesus is for everyone.

3 Extremely Important Lessons Learned From The Woman At The Well

Seventh-day Adventists believe in inspiring those around us to experience a life of wholeness and hope for an eternal future with God. Conflict is in the air from the beginning of the Gospel of John. At that point, John introduces a subtle break in the story. The word but is soft, but there is, nevertheless, a flag waving to the reader to slow down. Did Jesus, strictly speaking, have to go through Samaria? What lies behind the notion that Jesus had to go through Samaria? There were other routes between Judea and Galilee—the coastal route or the Jordan Valley. In the Gospel of John, Jesus never, or almost never, will do things simply because circumstances make Him do it. This imposes on the reader the task of finding some other explanation for the necessity in this story. Jesus has to go through Samaria not because Samaria is on His way, but because Samaria is on His mind.

Lessons from the woman at the well

I met Tamara at the Dallas Juvenile Center and found her willing to talk as we sat at the table. But how could I proceed with this young woman who had a fundamental misunderstanding of salvation? The same way Jesus did. Jesus met a woman as she approached a well in Samaria, and He opened a conversation by asking her for a drink.

When the woman realized that Jesus knew all about her life, she thought He was a prophet.

Back when I was a freshman in high school, I remember telling my cousin that he was going to die and go to hell. We all have in our minds what we would deem bad evangelism or evangelistic tactics. So, what about good evangelism? What does good evangelism look like?

Samaritan Woman at the Well - Workshop Lessons and Ideas | Rotation.org

Question: "What can we learn from the woman at the well? This was an extraordinary woman. She was a Samaritan , a race of people that the Jews utterly despised as having no claim on their God, and she was an outcast and looked down upon by her own people.

John , Lessons. Read John You may also want to explain to the children about the relationship between the Samaritans and the Jews; how the Jews avoided the Samaritans and did not associate with them. To understand some of the reasons why there was hatred between the Jews and the Samaritans you may want to read this article. You may also want to communicate the story through one of the videos below:.

‘The Woman At the Well Encounters Jesus’ Childrens Lesson

The woman at the well Jesus spoke with has been used for many lessons for Christians today. After his early ministry in Judea, Jesus returned to Galilee passing through Samaria. In the meantime, a woman from the city came out to draw water. Jesus asked the Samaritan woman for a drink. The Lord was speaking of the water of life, the gospel which brings salvation to lost men. The woman was more interested in literal water so that she would not have to come to the well for water.

Ministry lessons from the woman at the well. As you read this A Samaritan woman came to draw water, and Jesus said to her, “Give me a drink.” (His disciples.

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Hidden Questions: Lessons From the Woman at the Well

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The Samarian Woman at the Well

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